No Man is an Island

man-with-cell-phone

This week we started the New Year in the Olderhood International Club with a passionate discussion regarding the purpose of life. It was a fascinating opportunity to share your point of view with members from different countries in an environment of openness, respect and trust.

This week’s blog post was actually inspired by OIC member Olivia Ochoa, who was actually responding to a different subject when she wrote the following:

“You are not here to do it all alone. Do you know how to grow rice?, spin yard or make electricity? No one does it all alone. That’s why people have each other. Relying on and supporting each other is what makes the world go round. Don’t be shy about asking for help.”

The point is simple. Regardless of what God we honour or what we each believe regarding the existence of past lives, or what happens when we die; the following are undeniable truths:

·         We are all here now

·         We are all social beings – we don’t do well in isolation

·         Life here will not get better unless we stop judging each other and cooperate

·         Without cooperation the only thing that thrives is Chaos

Many of us have lived long enough to have lost people dear to us to war or disease and know firsthand the pain of that loss. Many of us have become estranged from our remaining family for one reason or another and know what isolation feels like. But it does not have to be this way. No matter how remote you are from other people, if you have a mobile phone – you have internet access.

And if you have internet access – you have a communication line to endless means of support, friendship and encouragement. Believe it or not, at least 45% of the people who access our Facebook pages do so by means of a mobile phone; they literally hold the world in the palm of their hands.

I live in a developed country where a great many people have Ipads, and laptops and wireless internet access in their homes. I find this absolutely fascinating that the world has evolved to the point where a person in a remote rural village can also carry the internet about in their pocket and ask friends around the world for advice regarding sore feet, or their teenage grandchildren.

The trick now is to help everyone feel comfortable asking for help by whatever means they are using to access the internet; and to create places where these conversations can take place irrespective of our cultural, religious or political origins. That is the goal of olderhood.com and the OIC. To that end, we will shortly be adding yet another communication platform to olderhood.com – watch for an exciting announcement in the coming weeks. And until then …

Namaste

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